treating adults: recent publications

“Have I Overreacted? Big Time? 5 Ways I Rectify Emotional Outbursts”

ADHD symptoms have evolved so that individuals with ADHD are hard-wired to recognize a true threat and assess and react instantaneously, without fear or consideration of long-term consequences.We skip all the bits we don’t need, including logic, and jump straight into action. Our thoughts are on autopilot: Just stop the threat.

Make everyone safe. Do not rest until your mission is complete.

Deal with the aftermath later.The only problem is that this time the big threat consists of… 10 party poppers and a loud “Surprise!”[Free Download: Rate Your ADHD Coping Strategies]But it’s too late. I hear loud bangs and see lots of movement in what should be my empty apartment.

 I hyperfocus on the bright streamers and the fiery candles thrust into my face along with the loud noises around me. My mind and body are consumed: “We’re under attack: Protect your girlfriend!” I swiftly forgo the non-threatening cues and details.

I don’t just ruin the surprise; I decimate it.My flight-or-fight impulses cause me to shove the homemade cake my adorable grandma was wielding from behind the front door away from me with one hand and launch my partner back down the hall to protect her with the other.Now grandma’s lying over a bean bag four feet away from her Zimmer frame (walker), her legs and petticoats waving in the air above her, covered in icing that reads ‘Happy Birthday’ and four letters of my name. Meanwhile, I’m standing in the middle of this mess shouting, “Sorry! Sorry! Sorry!” while flapping my arms like a penguin that just drank four espressos.Everyone’s yelling and looking at me in horror (except for grandma who assures me that “It’s quite alright, dear!” while I slip over my freshly iced floor in a rush to pick her up, and my

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treating adults: Readers Choice

ADHD symptoms have evolved so that individuals with ADHD are hard-wired to recognize a true threat and assess and react instantaneously, without fear or consideration of long-term consequences.We skip all the bits we don’t need, including logic, and jump straight into action. Our thoughts are on autopilot: Just stop the threat.
ADHD, who may interrupt too much, speak too quickly, or space out unintentionally and miss key elements of a conversation. As a result, many individuals worry that they will say something stupid in conversation, or that they’ll try so hard to appear “normal” that they end up looking strange. The task becomes so daunting, people may question their ability to engage in naturally flowing, comfortable conversations.There’s a general assumption that people know the unspoken, unwritten, and often mysterious rules of social engagement.

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