routines: recent publications

“Q: When I Check Homework and Schedules, My Teen Calls Me a Nag!”

Q: “Twice a week, I make my 14-year-old daughter sit down with me to show me her planner and assignments. She gets so angry when I do this.

She feels like I’m nagging, but I need to know what is going on with her schoolwork and activities to plan our family calendar and to anticipate areas where she may need support. It’s a constant battle.

What can I do?” – CRosenHi CRosen:Your question really resonated with me. When my son (who has ADHD) was in middle school, WE would hold bi-weekly meetings.

“We” is the operative word.  I presented these “meetings” to Eli as a joint-partnership, and not as a one-sided conversation. It was important to me that he felt it was as necessary to know what was going on in my week as much as I needed to know

. treating kids Dear ADHD Family Coach routines
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routines: Readers Choice

Q: “Twice a week, I make my 14-year-old daughter sit down with me to show me her planner and assignments. She gets so angry when I do this.
The Spoon Theory posits that individuals start each day with a certain amount of energy — or number of spoons — that daily tasks and activities deplete.As you might imagine, those living with chronic conditions have fewer spoons than do their neurotypical counterparts. What’s more, tasks and activities require more spoons from neurodiverse brains, leading to daily spoon shortages (or acute fatigue).

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