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Why Am I So Sad All the Time For No Reason?

Everyone feels sadness from time to time. You can feel sad for many reasons, like receiving bad news, fighting with a friend or significant other, or just having a stressful day at work. Although sadness is a normal and common (and believe it or not, healthy) emotion, it’s not something you should constantly feel.Persistent sadness can be overwhelming, especially when you don’t know why you’re unhappy.

You might ask yourself questions like why am I always sad? or why am I sad for no reason? Most often, sadness is temporary, so if you’re feeling sad all the time, it could be a cause for concern. Learning how to deal with sadness and how to get out of a depressive episode is key to managing it before it turns into something more like a medical condition. Keep reading to learn more about why you might be feeling sad all the time. “There are usually reasons we feel sad, but these are sometimes conscious reasons like changes in the season or feeling overwhelmed from work, family schedules, or finances.

Sometimes when we’re feeling stressed or overwhelmed but we don’t address it, it can feel like sadness.” Much like happiness, sadness is a vast spectrum. It can range from a sad feeling of mild disappointment to deep grief and unhappiness. People react to these feelings in many ways, and sadness can trigger both emotional and physical symptoms.Why am I always sad?Why do I feel sad for no reason? You might feel confused or frustrated if you’ve ever asked yourself these questions.

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[Self-Test] Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder in Children
Avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) is an eating disorder often characterized as “extreme picky eating.” Food avoidance or restriction in ARFID can be due to any of the following:1Unlike other eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, the eating behaviors seen in ARFID are not associated with concerns about body weight or shape. Children with ARFID may struggle to meet nutritional and/or energy needs, and they may be dependent on nutritional supplements for functioning.ARFID often co-occurs with autism, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).2 Some symptoms of autism, like rigid eating behaviors and sensory sensitivity, overlap with ARFID.If you suspect that your child has symptoms of ARFID, answer the questions below and share the results with your child’s pediatrician or a licensed mental health professional who is experienced in diagnosing and treating ARFID.If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, contact the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) for support, resources, and treatment options. Call or text NEDA at 800-931-2237 or visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org to reach a NEDA volunteer.This self-test was adapted in part from the Nine Item ARFID Screen (NIAS) and incorporates findings from research on ARFID.
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[Self-Test] Eating Disorders in Children and Teens
Eating disorders like anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED) typically begin in adolescence, but they are increasingly seen in younger children.Researchers have linked the rise of eating disorders in children and teens to the pandemic and the ongoing youth mental health crisis, among other stressors.12Social media may also play a role in driving body image dissatisfaction and negative comparison among teens.3 What’s more, children and teens with conditions like anxiety, depression, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at greater risk for developing eating disorders.4 ,5Eating disorders are complex but treatable conditions. Early detection greatly improves recovery and health outcomes.If you are concerned that your child is showing signs of an eating disorder like AN, BN, or BED, answer the questions below and share the results with your child’s pediatrician or a licensed mental health professional who is experienced in diagnosing and treating eating disorders.If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, contact the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) for support, resources, and treatment options. Call or text NEDA at 800-931-2237 or visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org to reach a NEDA volunteer.This self-test was adapted from materials provided in “Identification and Management of Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents” published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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