lessons: recent publications

19 Great Truths My Grandmother Told Me on Her 90th Birthday

“I have seen and touched and danced and sang and climbed and loved and meditated on a lifetime spent living honestly. Should it all end tonight, I can positively say there would be no regrets. I feel fortunate to have walked 90 years in my shoes.

I am truly lucky. I really have lived 1,000 times over.”Those are the opening lines of the final entry in my grandmother Zelda’s journal—a 270-page leather-bound journal she wrote small entries in almost every morning during the final decade of her life. In it, she reflected on lessons she had learned, lessons she was still learning, and the experiences that made these understandings possible.When my grandmother was diagnosed with terminal cancer on her 90th birthday, I sat with her in a hospital room for the entire day, in silence, in laughter, in tears, and in awe.

Although her body was weak, her mind was intensely strong. The terminal diagnosis inspired her to think about her life, everything she had journaled about over the years, and reflect aloud. So, I gave her the stage—my undivided attention—from sunrise until sunset.As I sat beside her hospital bed, she thumbed through her journal one page at a time, reading dozens of specific entries she wanted me to hear.

She spoke softly and passionately about her life, her loves, her losses, her pain, her dreams, her achievements, her happiness, and all the lessons that embodied these points of reference. It was without a doubt one of the most enlightening and unforgettable days of my life.My grandmother passed away exactly two weeks later, peacefully in her sleep. The day after her passing I found out she formally left her journal for me in her will.

happiness feelings lessons

Told Me

www.marcandangel.comwww.marcandangel.com

lessons: Readers Choice

“I have seen and touched and danced and sang and climbed and loved and meditated on a lifetime spent living honestly. Should it all end tonight, I can positively say there would be no regrets. I feel fortunate to have walked 90 years in my shoes.
I live in a world of acronyms. At first, they were purely medical. EDS, POTS, PCOS, UC, MCAS, CPTSD, IBD, etc. They, along with their cousins who insist on being called by their full names like some pretentious teenager after returning from a semester abroad, would accompany me to doctors’ offices. Once there, I’d rattle them off in a jumbled version of the alphabet that almost sounded like a beat poet with an even more than usual preoccupation with death and suffering.

Related articles