feelings: recent publications

How to Stay Safe And Healthy in the Workplace During the Pandemic

One in 10 U.S. employees says that nothing would make them feel comfortable working in a space with other people.These numbers suggest that many of us aren’t sure how to protect ourselves in the workplace during the pandemic. To offer you some guidance on staying safe in the workplace, I’ve prepared a list of preventive measures you can take to protect yourself and everyone around you.If you feel that air in a room is stuffy, the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are most likely up, and it’s time to let some fresh air in.

Small spaces can quickly build up carbon dioxide from breath, and it’s acknowledged that the CO2 levels in the air are indicators for the risk of transmission of diseases, including Covid-19. Therefore, adequate air quality is one of the main prerequisites of staying safe in the workplace.If you aren’t a decision-maker within the company, ask your employer to invest in a device that monitors indoor air quality and CO2 concentration. If they aren’t convinced, show them proof that stuffy air isn’t only unpleasant—it’s also a health hazard.

The bottom line is that air monitoring is a simple and effective way to reduce the risk of infection with any virus and Covid-19, in particular. You can also expect employers to take measures to improve the office ventilation systems to help you protect yourself in the workplace during the pandemic. If this is not possible right away, suggest creating schedules for ventilating the rooms every hour and reducing the number of people sitting in each room.

liking feelings Work
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feelings: Readers Choice

One in 10 U.S. employees says that nothing would make them feel comfortable working in a space with other people.These numbers suggest that many of us aren’t sure how to protect ourselves in the workplace during the pandemic. To offer you some guidance on staying safe in the workplace, I’ve prepared a list of preventive measures you can take to protect yourself and everyone around you.If you feel that air in a room is stuffy, the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are most likely up, and it’s time to let some fresh air in.
is interested in you. The other person might be too nervous to say something, but they’ll still exhibit some of these indications. Then, you can take the lead if you have feelings for the person, too.If you notice that someone lights up anytime you walk in the room.

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One Hell of a First Exposure and Response Therapy Session for OCD
I breathe deep and shake out my shoulders, letting my breath loosen the knots in my stomach. I’ve met enough therapists in my mental health journey that the initial sessions don’t phase me much anymore. Today is different, though, at least in part because I’ve never met a therapist online. My nerves start to settle as we work through the get-to-know-you questions, and — he blindsides me. He reaches off-screen and grabs a knife, holding it casually in front of the screen like it’s no big deal. It’s a letter opener, he tells me. Somewhere in the logical minority of my mind, I know that letter openers aren’t all that sharp. Still, the one glinting at me through the screen is shaped like a sword, and I feel my composure start to crack. After a brief discussion of how the on-screen blade is making me feel, my new therapist — remember, I have never met this man before in my life — swivels the point of the blade toward his throat and rests it against his skin, right over where his jugular vein must be. My palms are drenched. My heart is racing. My stomach could outweigh the sun. Despite my growing desire to slam my laptop shut and never see this person ever again, I sit still and finish the session, trying my best to stay present as my new therapist removes the letter opener from the screen and talks me through the experience.